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    GET RID OF CAT AND DOG PARASITES!

    PARASITE PREVENTION AND TREATMENT: GET RID OF FLEAS, MITES, WORMS, TICKS, AND MORE

    As you know, cats and dogs are susceptible to parasite infections, which can cause all kinds of ailments and symptoms. Some can even spread to other pets or to humans—meaning you and your family. Your Globalvet team is here to help you prevent, recognize, and treat parasites and get rid of them for good.

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    Clinique vétérinaire de la Promenade
    1567, rue Fleury Est
    Montréal (Québec) H2C 1S7 514 383-2345
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      EXTERNAL AND INTERNAL PARASITES: LEARN TO SPOT THEM

      Pets are at risk of infection from two types of parasites: external and internal. As their name indicates, external parasites attach themselves to the outside of your pet’s body, i.e., to their skin or fur. This category includes mites, fleas, and ticks. External parasites spread diseases, lay eggs, cause itching, and more.

      Internal parasites, on the other hand, invade your pet’s internal organs like their intestines, stomach, arteries, heart, or lungs. They tend to cause symptoms like vomiting, diarrhea, and lung or circulatory problems.

      WHICH PARASITES ARE MOST COMMON IN CATS AND DOGS?

      TICKS

      Ticks are an external parasite that are becoming more prevalent in Quebec. They primarily live in wooded areas and can cling to your pet’s skin (no matter how long their fur is!) and suck their blood. Ticks can also spread certain diseases. If you find a tick on your cat or dog, remove it and schedule an appointment at your Globalvet clinic.

      Ask your veterinarian for tick prevention tips.

      HOOKWORMS

      These intestinal parasites are shaped like a hook, hence their name. They are of the ancylostoma species. Hookworm infections can be transmitted:

      • Via the skin
      • From eating dirt, grass, or contaminated food
      • Through breastfeeding

      Hookworms live in the intestines, ingest blood, and can cause anemia, especially in kittens and puppies. They can be transmitted to humans via the skin, so it’s best to keep your pet from getting infected and contaminating your environment. How? Check with your veterinary clinic to find out what cat and dog dewormers they carry.

      WHIPWORMS

      Also called trichuris trichiura, these intestinal parasites can reach 5 to 7 cm as full-grown adults. Their name comes from the fact that 75% of their body is a whip-like filament. In Canada, whipworms only infect dogs. A major infection can cause bloody diarrhea. Concerned your dog might be infected? Talk to your veterinarian.

      HEARTWORMS

      In Quebec, heartworms are unique to dogs. They are transmitted via mosquito bite and reside in the heart and arteries. They cause circulatory problems and can even be fatal, so it’s best to prevent them altogether. Talk to your veterinarian about prevention.

      FLEAS

      Fleas are external parasites that are transmitted from one animal to another and multiply rapidly. They can lay 50 eggs a day in your pet’s coat and spread like wildfire through your home. If you think your pet has a flea problem, talk to your veterinarian.

      Want to know more? Visit Health Canada’s Fleas page.

      ROUNDWORMS

      In Canada, these intestinal parasites commonly infect pets, including cats and dogs. They can also spread to their human companions (you!), but your immune system can easily fight them off. Children are more susceptible because they have weaker immune systems. Roundworms can migrate through their tissue—even all the way to the eyes, potentially causing irreversible vision loss.

       

      Roundworms reproduce very quickly: a female roundworm can lay up to 85,000 eggs a day! If your cat or dog brings them into your home, it can be a real problem, especially since their eggs are resistant to environmental conditions and can survive for many years. When it comes to your pet, prevention is key. Talk to your veterinarian!

      LUNGWORMS

      Lungworms are a relatively recent phenomenon in Quebec and elsewhere in Canada. Dogs usually get infected from eating snails and slugs. Lungworms take up residence in the trachea, bronchi, and bronchioles, causing coughing and other symptoms. Does your dog have a taste for slugs? Talk to your veterinary team about it.

      MITES

      Mites are invisible to the naked eye. There are a number of different types, including ear mites. They are common in kittens and can easily spread to other cats and dogs. The most common symptoms are itching and dark debris in the ear. An infected ear can contain up to 1,000 mites!

      Other mite species can cause skin conditions like itching and hair loss.

      Kitty can’t stop scratching? Book an appointment with your veterinarian to rule out a mite infection.

      TAPEWORMS

      Your cat or dog can catch these intestinal parasites from eating small rodents or fleas. If you have an outdoor cat who likes to hunt, they’re more at risk. Signs of a tapeworm infection include small segments of white grubs near your pet’s tail or in their stool.

      Echinoccocus, a type of flatworm, is an emerging threat in Canada and can cause tumour-like symptoms and health problems in your dog (or even you!).

      GIARDIA

      Giardia are single-celled intestinal parasites that are invisible to the naked eye. The infection they cause is frequently found in puppies but can also affect humans. Diarrhea is the most common symptom in both dogs and their humans.

      COCCIDIA

      These single-celled intestinal parasites can cause severe diarrhea, especially in kittens and puppies.

      PREVENTION IS THE BEST MEDECINE

      The best way to make sure your cat or dog stays critter-free is to prevent parasites in the first place! How? By following a parasite control plan. The specifics may depend on your furry friend’s lifestyle. For instance, if you have an indoor cat who doesn’t hang out with any other pets, certain dewormers are unnecessary. Discuss it with your Globalvet clinic veterinary team. They have all the answers!

      HOW TO DETECT CAT AND DOG PARASITES

      Cats and dogs can be screened for worms and other parasites through a health exam or lab tests (e.g., stool sample, blood test).

      WHEN SHOULD YOU DEWORM YOUR CAT OR DOG?

      The sooner, the better. Some parasites are transmitted via the placenta during pregnancy, even before a kitten or puppy is born. And transmission can continue through breastfeeding. That’s why adult worms can be found in kittens and puppies that are only 2 or 3 weeks old.

      Your cute little companion can become a potential source of infection for you, your other pets, and your home. Start things off on the right paw and ask your veterinarian to deworm your newly adopted friend early on. Then keep up the deworming treatments for the first 6 months before adjusting the schedule to fit your pet’s lifestyle. It’s important to keep your new pet pest-free!

      Adopting an adult cat or dog? Although most shelters treat their boarders, it’s best to do it again to make sure they’re not bringing any parasites home with them. Come in to see us and we’ll discuss the treatment options.

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