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    Cat and dog X-rays and ultrasound

    CAT AND DOG X-RAYS AND ULTRASOUND: SEE WHAT’S HAPPENING ON THE INSIDE

    Globalvet veterinarians have access to sophisticated tools and tests they can use to identify and monitor health problems in your cat or dog. X-rays and ultrasound, for instance, can help them see what’s happening inside your pet’s body.

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    X-RAYS FOR CATS AND DOGS: WHEN AND WHY

    X-rays are an important tool in a veterinarian’s investigative arsenal. An X-ray is basically an image or photo of an organ or bone in your pet’s body. Your vet uses them to see and understand what’s going on inside and make a more accurate diagnosis as a result.

    Obviously your vet can use an X-ray image to detect a broken bone, but they can also see if an object is lodged in your pet’s intestine or if their bronchial tubes are inflamed. Just like your doctor could do for you!

    All Globalvet veterinary clinics are equipped to take X-rays onsite. Sometimes the veterinarian or animal health technician may administer a sedative to reduce your cat’s or dog’s stress or keep them from fidgeting during the procedure.

    WHEN IS AN X-RAY NECESSARY?

    The veterinarian may advise you to have your pet X-rayed if they need more information about what’s going on inside your companion’s body. Veterinarians can use X-rays to:

    • Interpret a change observed in the physical exam, like:
      • Is your dog’s swollen paw fractured?
    • Rule out or confirm certain hypotheses:
      • Does your cat have bladder stones?
    • Monitor an issue:
      • Has your kitten’s pneumonia cleared up?

    ULTRASOUND FOR CATS AND DOGS: WHEN AND WHY

    Ultrasound is a form of medical imaging that allows your veterinarian to observe the shape, condition, and functioning of your pet’s internal organs, including the uterus, heart, and lungs. It can be used to both diagnose and monitor a problem. Your veterinary clinic may recommend an ultrasound for:

    • Vomiting
    • An anomaly detected in a laboratory test
    • A urinary problem
    • Monitoring kidney disease
    • Monitoring your pet’s pregnancy
    • Monitoring heart and lung problems

    Most Globalvet clinics have the equipment needed to do ultrasounds onsite, but in certain situations your veterinarian may refer you to a veterinary specialist. Sometimes the veterinarian or animal health technician may administer a sedative to reduce your cat’s or dog’s stress or keep them from fidgeting during the procedure.

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